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CAPE DUTCH




Darling Towers Farm

Beverley Hui Architects designs this home for a farm in Darling in the historical Cape Dutch style that is an architectural phenomenon unique to South Africa.houses typically have timber windows and thatched roofs but this newly built home uses corrugated roof sheeting and uPVC windows instead. The H-shaped plan, curvy gables and perfect proportions characteristic of the style have been maintained by the architect. The building is for a farmstead in Darling and overlooks the picturesque town.

See bellow for photos of more new designs as well as classic historical examples.


Gable and Solar Panels

The original masters would never have dreamed their style would endure to the time when power is created by solar panels on the roof alongside the gable.


The style originated when the Dutch Settlers were faced with much bigger tracts of land to build their houses on then back in Holland. As the years went on the gables became more elaborate and the plans more spacious and sophisticated but always maintaining the central gable and sliding sash windows. Today, Beverley Hui continues the tradition designing unique gems on wine farms in the style.







NORMANDY BOUTIQUE HOTEL IN FRANSCHHOEK

The NORMANDY BOUTIQUE HOTEL is a concept desgin for a luxury boutique hotel on the slopes of the Boschendal mountain. The u-shaped design creates opportunities to arrange the gables in the correct places, while creating a sheltered private courtyard for the swimming pool.


DARLING TOWERS FARM IN DARLING

DARLING TOWERS FARM is located on a farm overlooking the picturesque town of Darling. The carefully placed windows, gables and outside stair maintain the Cape Dutch look, while creating something entirely unique.


THE SOLAR PANELS GENERATE POWER FOR THE HOME

The h-shaped plan provides for a long central stoep, the heart of the home, with stunning views. Above, are the SOLAR PANELS that make the home completely independent for its power source.


HOUSE FERNWOOD IN SOMERSET WEST

HOUSE FERNWOOD: Breaking away from tradition a little, the smokey coloured walls add depth to the facade. Instead of a central door, there is a water feature, and four large double doors stand either side of it allow the home to live out onto the garden. Small dormer windows and a pergola soften the appearance.

PHOTOS OF HISTORICAL EXAMPLES


This is a comprehensive collection of photos of genuine historical farmsteads dotted around the Western Cape, taken by the architect:



ZEVENWACHT



The Cape's best kept secret, this exquisite gem has only two windows on each flank, unlike the more common arrangement of three each side. The gable is beautifully adorned without becoming overly intricate. The setting with the lake in front and the vineyards in the background, is difficult to match and changes beautifully with the seasons.

ZEVENWACHT

NEETHLINGHOF CELLAR



A good example of the style, this cellar building is located just outside of Stellenbosch on Neethlinghof farm. The delicately crafted plaster pillars have been kept in good condition by the owners - so important for these buildings to last for the next generations.

NEETHLINGHOF CELLAR

LE PROVIDENCE



A delicate gable with a well balanced facade are viewed through the immaculate gardens either side of the entrance driveway. Cypress trees, Bougain Villas and white roses, are all imports to the Cape, but combine here to enhance the charm of this prime estate in Franschhoek.

LE PROVIDENCE

LA DAUPHINE



Also in Franschhoek, this stunning classic has appeared on many book covers over the years. The gable is in the Neoclassical style, which has columns and a pediment instead of sculptural curves. Privately owned and immaculately kept, the house and gardens are preserved for those who seek it out to glimpse this hidden gem.

LA DAUPHINE

WHAT ARE THE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE STYLE ?


The plans of the houses were typically in a h-shape or t-shape, having thatched roofs and white walls. The width of each barn in the arrangement was typically no wider than 6m to accommodate the timber roofing structure and materials. Windows and doors were placed symmetrically on the facade wherever possible, and were normally of the sliding sash type. Almost always, the walls were plastered with the stucco of the day and painted white. The gables were the hallmark of the style, and were curvilinear or pedimented depending on the age. Outside low white walls linked spaces together and a slave bell was never far from the main manor house.



PHOTO OF ZORGVLIET - BY HISTORICAL ARCHITECT



PHOTO OF ZORGVLIET - BY HISTORICAL ARCHITECT. One of the boldest examples of its kind, the manor house has two doors instead of the usual single central door.

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